Which States Do Not Require Car Insurance in 2024?

Which States Do Not Require Car Insurance

Which states do not require car insurance? Only New Hampshire and Virginia don’t make car insurance mandatory. Nevertheless, every state has laws on how much car insurance you need, from Alaska to California and Indiana to New York. Make sure you know what your state requires to keep yourself covered.

Also, remember that the specific amount of insurance you must have varies by state. This means the coverage you need depends on where you live.

In some states, you only need liability insurance, which covers when you hurt someone or damage their stuff. Other states might ask for more medical coverage, known as personal injury protection. This pays for your health bills if you get hurt in a car. And in some areas, you might need insurance in case someone without enough coverage hits you. But remember, these rules can be different in each state.

You do not have to get collision and comprehensive coverage if you don’t want to, no matter where you live. But they can still be really useful. Just focus on what your state needs. Go to your state’s website and make sure your coverage meets the requirements.

Which States Do Not Require Car Insurance?

Only two states, New Hampshire and Virginia, do not need car insurance. In Virginia, drivers can choose to pay $500 a year to the state instead of getting insurance, but this won’t cover accidents. Remember, even if insurance is not a must in these states, people are still responsible for any harm they cause to others.

What Car Insurance Do I Need?

Different states have different car insurance rules, but almost every state needs drivers to have some liability coverage.

Other parts of car insurance are needed in certain states, not in others. It’s good to learn about the types of coverage that make up car insurance. Below, we explained the basic parts of what’s usually called “full coverage” car insurance:

Type of CoverageFunction
Paying for Bodily InjuriesHelps with medical bills if you hurt someone in a crash.
Paying for DamagePart of liability coverage that pays for damage to property you’ve caused in a crash.
Medical Bills CoveragePays for your own or your passengers’ medical bills after a crash.
Protection from Uninsured DriversPays for expenses if you’re in a crash caused by a driver with insufficient or no car insurance.
ComprehensivePays for repairs if your car is damaged while not being driven (e.g., due to falling objects, weather, theft). Also pays for a new car if yours is stolen.
CollisionPays for repairs to your car after a crash, regardless of who was at fault.

Additional Notes:

  • Comprehensive and Collision coverages are optional and not mandated by law in any state, but they provide additional protections that liability coverage doesn’t offer.
  • Comprehensive coverage is useful for non-driving-related damages.
  • Collision coverage is applicable for damages incurred during driving, irrespective of fault.

Car Insurance Requirements in Every State

You have to get at least the minimum car insurance that your state asks for, which depends on where you live most of the time. If you move to a different state, you might need more insurance on your policy according to the new state’s rules.

StateInsurance Requirements
AlabamaUp to $25,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
AlaskaUp to $50,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $100,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection. Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
ArizonaUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $15,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
ArkansasUp to $25,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
CaliforniaUp to $15,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $30,000 for total medical bills.Up to $5,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.Special: California Automobile Assigned Risk Plan for low-income drivers.
ColoradoUp to $25,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $15,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
ConnecticutUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
DelawareUp to $25,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $10,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
FloridaUp to $10,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $20,000 for total medical bills.Up to $10,000 for property damage.Mandatory personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
GeorgiaUp to $25,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
HawaiiUp to $20,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $40,000 for total medical bills.Up to $10,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
IdahoUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $15,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
IllinoisUp to $25,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $20,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
IndianaUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
IowaUp to $20,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $40,000 for total medical bills.Up to $15,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
KansasUp to $25,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Personal injury protection required.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
KentuckyUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Personal injury protection required.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
LouisianaUp to $15,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $30,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
MaineUp to $50,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $100,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
MarylandUp to $30,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $60,000 for total medical bills.Up to $15,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
MassachusettsUp to $20,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $40,000 for total medical bills.Up to $5,000 for property damage.Personal injury protection required.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
MichiganUp to $50,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $100,000 for total medical bills.Up to $10,000 for property damage.Personal injury protection required.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
MinnesotaUp to $30,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $60,000 for total medical bills.Up to $10,000 for property damage.Personal injury protection required.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
MississippiUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
MissouriUp to $25,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $10,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
MontanaUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $20,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
NebraskaUp to $25,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
NevadaUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $20,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
New HampshireNo mandatory insurance, but financial responsibility required.Optional medical and property damage coverage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
New JerseyUp to $15,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $30,000 for total medical bills.Up to $5,000 for property damage.Personal injury protection required.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
New MexicoUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $10,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
New YorkUp to $25,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $10,000 for property damage.Personal injury protection required.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
North CarolinaUp to $30,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $60,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
North DakotaUp to $25,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Personal injury protection required.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
OhioUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
OklahomaUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
OregonUp to $25,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $20,000 for property damage.Personal injury protection required.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
PennsylvaniaUp to $15,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $30,000 for total medical bills.Up to $5,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
Rhode IslandUp to $25,000 for individual medical costs.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
South CarolinaUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
South DakotaUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Optional uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.
TennesseeUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.. Up to $15,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Uninsured motorist coverage required.
TexasUp to $30,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $60,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Personal injury protection required.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
UtahUp to $3,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $15,000 for property damage.Personal injury protection required.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
VermontUp to $50,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $100,000 for total medical bills.Up to $10,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
VirginiaUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $20,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
WashingtonUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $10,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage optional.
West VirginiaUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $25,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
WisconsinUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $10,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage required.
WyomingUp to $25,000 for individual medical expenses.Up to $50,000 for total medical bills.Up to $20,000 for property damage.Optional personal injury protection.Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage optional.

Do I Need Minimum Coverage or Full Coverage?

Basic car insurance might not cover all the costs if there is an accident, including damage to your vehicle. Every state requires at least liability insurance, and some also ask for personal injury protection or coverage for uninsured drivers.

While comprehensive and collision coverage, which handles your car’s damage even if the accident is your fault, aren’t mandatory, they’re still important for a strong insurance plan.

Collision coverage helps pay for your car’s damage after an accident, no matter who’s at fault. Comprehensive coverage takes care of damage when your car isn’t being driven, like if something falls on it or you accidentally hit an object.

If you lack these coverages and something happens, like a tree causing a dent or you bump into something, you will need to pay for repairs yourself.

If you financed or leased your car, the company likely requires you to have these coverages. Some drivers might consider dropping them if their car’s value is low, but for most people, having full coverage with collision and comprehensive is the best choice.

What Happens if You Drive Without Insurance and Get Pulled Over?

The consequence of driving with too little insurance or no insurance at all depends on your state. If you are pulled over by the police or have an accident without having the right amount of insurance your state demands, below are things that might happen:

  1. If you have a car crash and don’t have enough insurance, you might have to use your own money to pay for the damage or injuries.
  2. If you can’t pay, your wages could be taken to cover the costs.
  3. If you break the rules and get fined, you might have to pay a lot of money.
  4. They could also take away your driver’s license and your ability to use your vehicle.
  5. If you do something wrong with your car, they might take it away or keep it for a while. And later on, your car insurance could become more expensive.

Frequently Asked Questions

While answering the question “which states do not require car insurance?” the following commonly asked questions have been identified.

What type of vehicle insurance do most states require you to have?

Almost in all states, you need liability coverage for your car, except in two states. This helps pay for the damage or injuries you cause to other drivers in a crash. In a few no fault states, you have to use your own insurance to pay for injuries after a crash. You need personal injury protection in those states.

Is car insurance mandatory in every state?

You need to make sure your car is registered and insured where you live. This means you have to meet the insurance requirements of your state. For example, if you live in New York, you must have at least $10,000 in insurance for property damage. But in Tennessee, you must have at least $15,000 in insurance for property damage.

Conclusion on Which States Do Not Require Car Insurance

Again, only New Hampshire and Virginia do not require car insurance. In Virginia, drivers can pay $500 to the state instead of getting insurance, but they’ll have to pay for any damage they cause in an accident. In New Hampshire, people have to pay for the damage caused without insurance, so it’s better to have car insurance to cover those costs.

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Read alsoCan You Get Insurance Without Registration

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